How We Exceeded Our Crowdfunding Goal

Last night marked the end of our Indiegogo campaign for This Is Art. Our funders reached our $6000 goal ten days early and we’ve had the last leg of the journey to exceed our goal by as much money as possible. After 34 days, we’ve raised $7,010. Because our donors have exceeded our goal by such a significant margin, we’ll be able to make the show just the way we envisioned it and still have enough money left over to help us start promoting the show. Needless to say, our gratitude is boundless!

Meeting our goal presented us with the challenge of incentivizing our community to go above and beyond our original request. We knew that once we met our goal, we’d have to give our donors a good reason to keep giving and that our influx of funds would slow down significantly.

We decided the first thing to do was to lay out exactly what the extra funds would be used for and to show donors the effect that those additional donations could have on the project. We knew we wanted to take the show to conventions and film festivals, but that gets surprisingly expensive. Originally we hadn’t put that into our budget because we were already unsure of our ability to even reach our initial $6000 goal just to cover the show. Exceeding our goal gave us the opportunity to cover those potential costs. However, we realized that some people weren’t going to be familiar with the kind of impact festivals and conventions could have on a webseries, so Emily wrote a great blog post about developing a community and garnering support through attending these events.

We had originally intended to do a Livestream event when we got close to our goal, but we reached it so fast that we didn’t have time to put it together beforehand. Instead we turned it into a celebration of our success and our donor’s valiant efforts to make the show the best it can be. I contacted our cast and crew and invited them to participate, whether it be on camera or in our chat room. We ended up with one special guest on camera, Clint Okayama, and Bryan Vu, our webmaster joined us in the chat room to moderate. We also had cast member Chris Ruth stop by the chat room for a little bit. We hoped that this event would function as an opportunity for our growing community to see the results of our efforts and to get a little more insight into the people behind the project. If you want a more detailed description of the event or if you want to view the recorded video of the broadcast, you can check out our post about it. In the end, this was a great community event and we’ll definitely do more like it.

When we got close to $7000, we pretty much stalled out and stopped getting donations which was completely understandable considering how many people have been so generous with their contributions. Still, I couldn’t resist setting just one more incentive milestone for our donors to see if we could in fact raise $1000 more than our goal. I released an announcement on all of our social media streams that if we broke $7k, we’d release our favorite piece of concept art yet. It was down to the wire, but we did reach that last milestone! So of course, we released our final bit of concept art for the campaign. I can’t believe our supporters met every goal we set forth. That just blows my mind and I love them for it!


As I drew up our four main characters in this image, I couldn’t help but to swell with excitement as I realized that very soon they’ll be leaping off of the page. It’s absolutely thrilling to be done with the daunting task of fundraising. I’ve been so humbled by the outpouring of support for the project and I cannot wait to tell our story!

I’d like to honor the funders who brought us through the home stretch of the campaign! Thank you all so much!

Anonymous
Markus Hunt
Katharine Nathan
Alan Ruscoe
Anonymous
Alexandra MacArthur

A full list of our donors can be found on our Donor page and I’ve done my best to link back to those with projects of their own. If you are one of our donors and would like a specific link attached to your name, please feel free to drop us a line at thisisartwebseries (at) gmail (dot) com and we’ll be sure to include it as soon as possible.

We’re now entering a new phase in our journey and we have lots of plans for production updates as we move through this part of our process. One of our major plans for the blog during this period is to feature content by other new media artists. So if you have a webseries, podcast, blog, vlog, webcomic, sketch blog, etc., link to your project in the comments and we’ll get in touch with you to do a feature. We already have a few submissions, but we’d love more!

Anne Richmond
@annerichmond
@followthisisart
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The 10 Best Sites About Webseries

A successful webseries isn’t just about good content. It’s about learning the territory.

As we developed the script for This is Art, and now as we march through preproduction and fundraising, I have been doing my best to keep up with industry news, watch as many other web shows as possible, and engage in meaningful dialogue with other webseries creators. The following is a list of sites that I check almost daily in order to improve my knowledge of new media entertainment.

News

Tubefilter aims to be the leading authority on web television and webseries. They were the creative minds behind The Streamy Awards (think of it as the Oscars of web tv) and the IAWTV (International Academy of Web Television). They post articles daily about developments in the industry, previews for new shows, and they cover major distribution deals as well.

Slebisodes not only provides news and reviews, but also amasses a broad list of webseries for you to browse.

 

 

Gigaom has a lot of great articles not just about webseries but about new media entertainment news in general in their NewTeeVee section.

 

Discovery

Koldcast is an online webseries channel that features several shows and even sponsors some of them. It’s just a great collection of shows with a lot of variety.

 

Blip.tv is a site that webseries creators use to distribute their shows across multiple platforms. They also feature episodes on the front page as well. This is a great tool if you’re creating webisodes, vlogs, or video podcasts. It can be helpful to see how others are using it.

Digital Chick TV was created by writer/director Daryn Strauss, who seeks to amass a reliable database of the finest online video content available for a female audience. The site breaks down its featured shows into a broad spectrum categories, from comedy to experimental, so you can easily find shows that might be similar to yours or explore genres you haven’t looked into yet.

Dialogue

Dialogik Digital is a boutique digital marketing consultancy for entertainment properties. They have several notable clients including Tubefilter (mentioned above), Anyone But Me (an award winning webseries), and the IAWTV. They also publish a blog that shares their PR strategies and news about their clients. I think it’s generous and very much in keeping with the spirit of this industry that they share their “how-to’s” with the rest of the community.

Celebrate the Web was created by Kim Evey and Jenni Powell in 2010 as a way for web content creators and their supporters to start a dialogue about the current state and the potential future of web tv. They mostly hold events on the west coast, but they also ran a pilot contest online that gave creators around the world an opportunity to win money to put towards producing their show. It’s got a serious “by the people, for the people” vibe that I really dig.

BigScreen LittleScreen is a monthly meetup series sponsored by Digitas, Tubefilter, 10ton, Focal Press, AskLocal/Zami.com, and Mo Video Mojo and hosted by Matthew Semel and Paul Kontonis. Every month, they present a group of videos and post viewing, you get a chance to do Q and A with the creators. There’s always great company, good conversation, and many opportunities for networking. I check their meetup page to sign up for the events because there’s limited capacity. If you are in NYC, definitely start attending. They also recently announced that there will be an LA version starting up soon.

“The New York Webseries” Facebook Group is a site I check daily without fail. You have to be a series creator/writer in order to join the group, but people post questions, suggestions, and show links every single day. It’s a very active hub and an extremely welcoming/supportive community. This is, of course, geographically focused, but if you’re a NY series creator, you’d be shooting yourself in the foot if you didn’t join the dialogue.

Those are my best 10 resources for the webseries industry. If you have more suggestions, please feel free to add them in the comments below!

-Anne Richmond

@annerichmond
@followthisisart
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